Where Did The Star of David Begin

This popular Jewish symbol is a six-pointed star formed by two overlapping equilateral triangles. It appears on many synagogues and also ON THE NATIONAL FLAG OF ISRAEL. The star symbol IS VERY OLD and was used as a decoration by MANY ANCIENT CULTURES, from Britain to Mesopotamia. The oldest known example dates from about 6000 B.C.

THE BURNING BUSH VERSES THE STAR OF DAVID

The oldest known symbol of Israel is NOT the Star of David but THE BURNING BUSH as mentioned in Exodus 3.

“And the angel of the LORD appeared unto him in a FLAME OF FIRE OUT OF THE MIDST OF A BUSH: and he (Moses) looked, and, behold, the bush burned with fire, and the bush was NOT CONSUMED.” (Exodus 3:2)

The burning bush symbolized Israel, A NATION NOT CONSUMED. In spite of many nations trying to annihilate the Jews, God has promised to preserve them and this has proven true in history.

BUT WHAT ABOUT THAT STAR?

Note that the above says that the star dates back to about 6000 B.C., and was in many ancient cultures. This is very important because THIS STAR HAS BEEN CONNECTED TO FALSE PAGAN WORSHIP and Moses had a very difficult time getting the people of Israel to forsake this false religion.

During the Middle Ages the symbol became connected with MAGIC and protection, along with the pentagram or five-pointed star.

The connection with magic DATES MUCH EARLIER THAN THE MIDDLE AGES for both stars (The six-point and the five-point) and this can easily be proven by a study on magic and witchcraft.

The Star of David also came to be called the Shield of David or the Seal of Solomon, although its use by these leaders is doubtful. The STAR OF DAVID IS NOT MENTIONED IN SCRIPTURE.

At this point the Bible appears to disagree with the above even though the phrase “Star of David” itself does not appear in the Bible, it is obvious that THERE IS A STAR MENTIONED. Please note the following verses.

TWO TABERNACLES MENTIONED IN SCRIPTURE

  • THE TRUE – “And Moses took the tabernacle, and pitched it without the camp, afar off from the camp, and called it THE TABERNACLE OF THE CONGREGATION. And it came to pass, that every one which sought the LORD went out unto the tabernacle of the congregation, which was without the camp.” (Exodus 33:7)
  • THE FALSE – “And the LORD spake unto Moses saying, Speak unto the congregation, saying, Get you up from about the TABERNACLE OF KORAH, DATHAN, AND ABIRAM.” (Numbers 16:23-24)

So according to the above two passages there were TWO TABERNACLES in the wilderness. The true and the false. Notice below how God in His word identifies these two tabernacles and places THE FALSE ONE WITH A STAR.

  • THE TRUE – “When God heard this, he was wroth, and greatly abhorred Israel: So that he forsook the TABERNACLE OF SHILOH, the tent which he placed among men.” (Psalms 78:59-60)
  • THE FALSE – “Have ye offered unto me sacrifices and offerings in the wilderness forty years, O house of Israel? But ye have borne the TABERNACLE OF YOUR MOLOCH AND CHIUN your images, the STAR OF YOUR GOD, WHICH YE MADE TO YOURSELVES.” (Amos 5:25-26)

STEPHEN MENTIONS THIS STAR IN ACTS 7

  • “Then God turned, and gave them up to WORSHIP THE HOST OF HEAVEN; as it is written in the book of the prophets, O ye house of Israel, have ye offered to me slain beasts and sacrifices by the space of FORTY YEARS IN THE WILDERNESS? Yea, ye took up THE TABERNACLE OF MOLOCH, AND THE STAR OF YOUR GOD REMPHAN, figures which ye made to worship them…” (Acts 7:42-43)

THE FALSE TABERNACLE AND THE TRUE TABERNACLE
ARE ALSO MENTIONED IN HEBREWS

  • “Now of the things which we have spoken this is the sum: We have such AN HIGH PRIEST (JESUS CHRIST), who is set on the right hand of the throne of the Majesty in the heavens; A minister of the sanctuary, and of THE TRUE TABERNACLE, WHICH THE LORD PITCHED, AND NOT MAN.” (Hebrews 8:1-2)

During the LAST TWO CENTURIES the six-pointed star has become a distinct Jewish symbol. One motive was the desire to have a common Jewish identification similar to the Christian cross.

Notice that it has ONLY BEEN THE PAST TWO CENTURIES that the star has become a distinct Jewish symbol.

Although the Nazis used the star as A BADGE OF SHAME during World War II, it came to represent unity and hope.

The Jewish people in Hitler’s time were not thinking of unity and hope. They were thinking of SURVIVAL.

Today the Star of David stands alongside the much older MENORAH or candelabrum as a symbol of Jewish tradition.

Even though the menorah is old THE BURNING BUSH IS OLDER and is in direct connection with the Jewish nation.

CONCLUSION

The burning bush is THE REAL SYMBOL of the Jewish Nation and not the Star of David. The Star of David (so called) is definitely from pagan origins and is not approved by God Almighty in the scriptures.

Who knows? Maybe when the Lord returns and sets up His kingdom He will present a NEW FLAG for Israel – with A BURNING BUSH on it AS A REMINDER to His people that HE LOVED THEM AND PRESERVED THEM THROUGHOUT THE AGES AS A NATION

God’s still on the Throne

…because everyone who has been fathered by God conquers the world. This is the conquering power that has conquered the world: our faith. (1 John 5:4)

At every turn in the road one can find something that will rob him of his victory and peace of mind, if he permits it. Satan is a long way from having retired from the business of deluding and ruining God’s children if he can. At every milestone it is well to look carefully to the thermometer of one’s experience, to see whether the temperature is well up.

Sometimes a person can, if he will, actually snatch victory from the very jaws of defeat, if he will resolutely put his faith up at just the right moment.

Faith can change any situation. No matter how dark it is, no matter what the trouble may be, a quick lifting of the heart to God in a moment of real, actual faith in Him, will alter the situation in a moment.

God is still on His throne, and He can turn defeat into victory in a second of time, if we really trust Him.

“God is mighty! He is able to deliver;
Faith can victor be in every trying hour;
Fear and care and sin and sorrow be defeated
By our faith in God’s almighty, conquering power.

“Have faith in God, the sun will shine,
Though dark the clouds may be today;
His heart has planned your path and mine,
Have faith in God, have faith alway.”

“When one has faith, one does not retire; one stops the enemy where he finds him.”
~Marshal Foch

Speak Truth, In Love

Christians often talk about the need to “speak the truth in love,” a command found in Ephesians 4:15. Many times what they mean is the need to share difficult truths in a gentle, kind, inoffensive manner. From a practical standpoint, we know that difficult things are best heard when our defenses are not up. In a loving, non-threatening environment, hard truths are more readily received. So it is biblical to share hard truths with others “in love,” in the manner that the phrase is commonly used. Looking at the context of Ephesians 4:15, however, gives us deeper insight on what it means to “speak the truth in love.”

In the verses prior to the command to speak the truth in love, Paul writes about unity in the body of Christ. He urges the Ephesians, and all Christians by extension, to “live a life worthy of the calling you have received” (Ephesians 4:1). He describes this life as one in which we are humble, gentle, patient, bearing with one another in love, and making efforts toward unity. Paul reminds his readers that we all serve the same Lord and are part of the same body. He talks about Christ giving apostles, prophets, evangelists, pastors, and teachers “to equip his people for works of service, so that the body of Christ may be built up until we all reach unity in the faith and in the knowledge of the Son of God and become mature, attaining to the whole measure of the fullness of Christ” (Ephesians 4:12–13). Having reached maturity, we will not be spiritual infants, easily deceived, and tossed to and fro “by the cunning and craftiness of people in their deceitful scheming” (Ephesians 4:14).

In this context—of church unity and spiritual maturity—Paul writes, “Speaking the truth in love, we will grow to become in every respect the mature body of him who is the head, that is, Christ” (Ephesians 4:15). Rather than be spiritually immature and easily deceived, we are to speak the truth to one another, with love, so that we can all grow in maturity. We are to train one another in truth—the foundational gospel truths, truths about who God is and what He has called us to do, hard truths of correction, etc.—and our motivation to do so is love.

The “love” referred to in this verse is agape love, a self-sacrificial love that works for the benefit of the loved one. We speak truth in order to build up. Several verses later Paul writes, “Do not let any unwholesome talk come out of your mouths, but only what is helpful for building others up according to their needs, that it may benefit those who listen” (Ephesians 4:29). Our words should be beneficial to the hearers of those words. We should speak truth in love.

Paul also counsels “to put off your old self, which is being corrupted by its deceitful desires; to be made new in the attitude of you minds; and to put on the new self, created to be like God in true righteousness and holiness. Therefore each of you must put off falsehood and speak truthfully to your neighbor, for we are all members of one body” (Ephesians 4:22–25). As members of the same body, we should not deceive one another. We cannot defraud each other through lies. Nor should we attempt to hide things about ourselves out of shame or in an effort to manage our images. Rather, as those who are part of the same body intended for the same purpose and united by the same love, we should be characterized by honesty. Those who love must speak the truth: “Love . . . rejoices with the truth” (1 Corinthians 13:6). Dishonesty is unloving and abusive.

Speaking the truth in love is not as much about having a gentle demeanor as it is about the way truth and love go hand-in-hand. Because we love one another, we must speak the truth. Because we know the truth, we must be people characterized by love (John 13:34–35; 15:1–17). Jesus “came from the Father, full of grace and truth” (John 1:14). As His followers who are being conformed to His image (Romans 8:29), we should also be characterized by grace and truth.

Importantly, we are also called to love those who do not know Christ. The best way we can show love is to share with them the truth of the gospel. Apart from Christ, people are dead in their sins and destined for an eternity in hell (John 3:16–18; Romans 6:23). But in Christ they can receive new life and eternal salvation (Romans 10:9–15; 2 Corinthians 5:17). This is a message we must share. Peter wrote, “In your hearts revere Christ as Lord. Always be prepared to give an answer to everyone who asks you to give the reason for the hope that you have. But do this with gentleness and respect” (1 Peter 3:15). We share the gospel because we love the people for whom Christ died. We speak God’s truth because of His love and in a way that clearly and unapologetically communicates both truth and love (1 John 4:10–12).

The Laws Purpose and Intent

James 2: 11-3

(11) For he that said, Do not commit adultery, said also, Do not kill. Now if thou commit no adultery, yet if thou kill, thou art become a transgressor of the law. (12) So speak ye, and so do, as they that shall be judged by the law of liberty. (13) For he shall have judgment without mercy, that hath shewed no mercy; and mercy rejoiceth

James highlights the importance of mercy in keeping the spirit of the law. He exhorts us to speak and act as those who are to be judged by “a law of liberty,” so that he sets no limit to the range of the law—meaning it covers all aspects of life.

In James 4:11, he warns us against speaking against the law or judging the law, that is, to assume the place of judge instead of “doer of the law.” Our efforts should not be in judging someone else and whether or not they are keeping the law. However, we should be looking inwardly to determine whether or not we are doing what is required—not only in the letter of the law but especially in its spirit.

James would not have used such language unless he had a profound conviction of the perfection of the law as a rule of life for the saints redeemed from its condemnation. Thus, we can call it the perfect law of liberty—the royal law. Many Christians do not look at the law of God as being perfect. They pick and choose which parts of the law they will obey, ones they feel most comfortable with, and they ignore the rest. Yet the apostle says in James 2:10, that if we break one, we break them all.

All sin is lawlessness, as I John 3:4 states, and the sum of all lawkeeping is love of God and love of the brethren Matthew 26: 33-40; Romans 13:8-10, so the summary of the old law is echoed and endorsed. And it is continued—because Christ did not come to destroy the law but to magnify it (Matthew 5: 17-178, Isaiah 42:21).

A Hunger For God

The more deeply you walk with Christ, the hungrier you get for Christ

. . . the more homesick you get for heaven the more you want “all the fullness of God”
. . . the more you want to be done with sin . . . the more

you want the Bridegroom to come again . . . the more you want the Church revived and purified with the beauty of Jesus
. . . the more you want a great awakening to God’s reality in the cities
. . . the more you want to see the light of the gospel of the glory of Christ penetrate the darkness of

all the unreached peoples of the world
. . . the more you want to see false worldviews yield to the force of Truth
. . . the more you want to see pain relieved and tears wiped away and death destroyed
. . . the more you long for every wrong to be made right and the justice and grace of God to fill the earth like the waters cover the sea.

If you don’t feel strong desires for the manifestation of the glory
of God, it is not because you have drunk deeply and are satisfied. It is because you have nibbled so long at the table of the world. Your soul is stuffed with small things, and there is no room for the great.”

John Piper

The Lord Heard Him

“The poor man cried out, and the Lord heard him” (Psalm 34:6). The man was alone, and the only one who heard him was the Lord. Yes, the Lord, Jehovah of Hosts, the All–glorious, heard his prayer. God stooped from His eternal glory and gave attention to this cry.

Never think that a praying heart pleads to a deaf God. Never imagine that God is so far removed that He fails to notice our needs. God hears prayer and grants His children’s desires and requests.

We can never pray earnestly until we believe that God hears prayer. I have been told, “Prayer is an excellent exercise, highly satisfying and useful, but nothing more. Prayer cannot move the Infinite Mind.” Do not believe so gross a lie or you will soon stop praying. No one prays for the mere love of the act. Amid all the innumerable actions of divine power, the Lord never ceases to listen to the cries of those who seek His face. This verse is always true, “The righteous cry out, and the Lord hears, and delivers them out of all their troubles” (Psalm 34:17). What a glorious fact! Truly marvelous!

This is still Jehovah’s special title: the God who hears prayer. We often come from the throne of grace as certain that God heard us as we were sure that we had prayed. The abounding answers to our supplications are proof positive that prayer climbs above the regions of earth and time and touches God and His infinity. Yes, it is still true, the Lord will hear your prayer.

~ Charles Haddon Spurgeon

Yeshua The Face Of Mercy

Knowing that we are called one of His very own, is revealing the revelation of love that is being manifested in our lives.
But, to know that YHVH Elohim has prepared beforehand vessels of mercy, so that we can receive His glory, is an entire separate marvelous mystery in itself.

In the Hebrew, there is a cluster of related words that are often translated as “mercy,” depending upon where they appear in the sentence.
There is “ahavah,” which refers to God’s enduring love for Israel, much like the love between man and woman.
Then there is “Rachamim,” which comes from the root word “rechem,” or womb, and therefore might be more literally understood as suggesting a “maternal connection” between YHVH and human beings.
In Psalm 85 it speaks of the Israelites’ return from exile, it is said that when “mercy and truth have met together, righteousness and peace have kissed.”
“Chesed,” the word translated as “mercy” in this verse, additionally suggests YHVH’s quality of “steadfast loyalty.” The psalm thus relates steadfastness and mercy with “truth”. In Hebrew the word for truth is “emet”, which means behaving ethically and being faithful to YHVH’s will.

Yeshua is the face of mercy.
In Matthew’s gospel, Yeshua tells His disciples to understand the meaning of the phrase:
“I desire mercy, not sacrifice. For I have not come to call the righteous, but sinners.”
Perhaps most significantly for us is that Yeshua shows us what it means to be merciful: He healed the sick, welcomed the stranger and pardoned those who persecuted and killed Him. He came to set us free from the curse of death and to reconcile us with Abba.

Mercy does matter!
And to know that you can be a vessels of mercy, and carry the glory of YHVH, is to know that you have the nature of Christ inside of you. Every morning we receive new mercy from YHVH. Every morning we should become empty vessels of honour in serving our King, knowing His mercy is inside of us, so that we can take it out into the world.
In this the revelation of the wealth of His glory, will be revealed to all, and all will know who YHVH Elohim is. His glory will be release to those who carry His mercy.

And doesn’t He also have the right to release the revelation of the wealth of His glory to His vessels of mercy, whom God prepared beforehand to receive His glory? Even for us, whether we are Jews or non-Jews, we are those He has called to experience His glory. – Romans 9:23-24

Warning Against The Teachers of The Law

Mark 12:38 “And he said unto them in his doctrine, Beware of the scribes, which love to go in long clothing, and [love] salutations in the marketplaces,”

“Beware Is to see or watch. It carries the idea of guarding against the evil influence of the scribes.

” A long, flowing cloak that essentially trumpeted the wearer as a devout and noted scholar.

“Salutations”: Accolades for those holding titles of honor.

These scribes, above, were not servants of their fellow men. They wanted to be looked up to as being special. Their prayers were are not sincere, they were only for those around them to hear and brag about how great they were. God does not care about fancy big worded prayers. He just wants us to pray from our hearts.

Mark 12:39 and have the most important seats in the synagogues and the places of honor at banquets.

“Chief seats in the synagogues”: The bench in the synagogue nearest the chest where the sacred scrolls were housed, an area reserved for leaders and people of renown (see note on James 2:3).

Mark 12:40 “Which devour widows’ houses, and for a pretense make long prayers: these shall receive greater damnation.”

“Devour widow’s houses”: Jesus exposed the greedy, unscrupulous practice of the scribes. Scribes often served as estate planners for widows, which gave them the opportunity to convince distraught widows that they would be serving God by supporting the temple or the scribes own holy work. In either case, the scribe benefited monetarily and effectively robbed the widow of her husband’s legacy to her.

“By saying long prayers, The Pharisees attempted to flaunt their piety by praying for long periods. Their motive was not devotion to God, but a desire to be revered by the people.

Many scribes of that day were dependent on generous individuals for their livelihood. Some abused the hospitality they were shown and brought their hopeless donors to the brink of financial ruin. Others flaunted their religion for the sale of impressing others with their spirituality, perhaps thereby obtaining more support.

Jesus Sober Words

Mark 12:38-40 and Jesus’ tough words of warning against the teachers of the Law.

The tension between Jesus and the Jewish authorities has been bubbling away all through this chapter – and not under the surface. Here Jesus gets explicit in his blunt criticism of the teachers of the law.

Scribes would have worn distinctive white long robes and been venerated as men of the Law. People would have risen when a Scribe passed by, they were treated with huge respect and given titles like Rabbi, Master or Father. It was an honour to have one at a banquet and prominent seats were reserved for them in the Synagogues.

As we’ve been reminded in the posts on One.Life, Jesus’ passion for justice lies at the heart of his preaching on the kingdom of God.

It so it is injustice that provokes this severe warning. The widows reference is probably about the unpaid scribes being dependent on gift income and taking advantage of widows hospitality and resources.

Comment: It is very hard to read this passage in an Irish context and not make a link to the abuse of religious power in this country. Where men were venerated and given untold respect and status. And where so many of those men used that position of trust and power for selfish and abusive purposes, taking advantage of the weak and vulnerable, and all the time being seen as models of piety.

One thing is clear – according to Jesus, such actions lead to severe punishment. God’s justice includes judgement.

But it is also hard to read this text and not feel Jesus’ call for integrity and authenticity in ministry. Those called to positions of leadership and public ministry need prayer: for honesty and humility and accountability along with a passion to serve God and others rather than themselves.

Warning Against the Teachers of the Law

38 As he taught, Jesus said, “Watch out for the teachers of the law. They like to walk around in flowing robes and be greeted with respect in the marketplaces, 39 and have the most important seats in the synagogues and the places of honor at banquets. 40 They devour widows’ houses and for a show make lengthy prayers. These men will be punished most severely.”